Dyslexia Potential

Turning dyslexia into a super power

Dyslexia Potential is a program for dyslexic children that helps them gain confidence, focus in the classroom, and be happier in and out of school. Rather than focusing on learning how to spell or read, Dyslexia Potential teaches kids clever tricks for embracing dyslexia and seeing it as their superpower – which was an instrumental design decision in the success of the project. I was responsible for coming up with engaging classroom content which went alongside a series of videos, a cohesive visual style, website, and marketing collateral. Every day children in New Zealand use Dyslexia Potential to turn dyslexia into their super power, and I think that's just so awesome.

View in Augmented Reality

As part of this project, I used Augmented Reality to prototype form quicker than building real life models, for instance times that I couldn't be in the workshop building real models or needed to test a small idea without spending time using foam/wood – I used Fusion 360 to model my designs, and  in some cases textured them using Substance Painter. Finally, I exported them as a .USDZ file (Apple & Pixar's new AR file format) and can share them to friends & stakeholders to visualize the product in their own spaces, in life size.

AR mode only works on iPhones and iPad.

Problem

The problem is, it's genuinely hard to figure out how much your summer roadtrip might cost. You can easily figure out accomodation costs, and you can budget for food costs, but unless you know your car really well it's hard to budget for gas prices – which, as it turns out can be fairly expensive!

Solution

We built Roadtrip to make it easy to figure out how much your road trip is going to cost, based on fuel prices. You simply enter your starting location, your destination, your car’s license plate and fuel type, then Roadtrip calculates how much it is likely to cost you.

User testing

Originally Roadtrip required users to enter their car’s fuel efficiency in KM/L. However, we realised something in user testing: Nobody in their right mind knows their cars fuel efficiency. Literally no one we talked to. So it was back to the drawing board, we had to come up with something that was easy for people to enter, but accurate enough that it wouldn’t show misinformation.

We considered having an option between 3 different car types, but after some research discovered that car’s since 1995 have become 25-30% more fuel efficient, so using an average could end up being very inaccurate.

So we thought, we need something that everyone knows about their car, that makes it unique. We considered using a database that had a variety of different car manufacturers, models, and years – but this result made the user experience a lot slower than we’d like from a simple calculator, and it meant it always had to be updated with new cars.

Then we had a breakthrough: What if it was possible to find out a car’s fuel efficiency, based on it’s licence plate. Lucky for us, it was. The team were able to create an API using an existing New Zealand licence plate fuel efficiency database, which meant we could call our own API and get the car's fuel efficiency. Magic.

No items found.
No items found.
No items found.
No items found.
No items found.
No items found.
No items found.
No items found.